Daily Archives: May 20, 2014

Unlock the door. #MTBoS 11 of 30

 

In #slowchated a while ago the topic was on Change.  Inspiring change, cultivating change, and the purpose of change.  I remember going through a course on leadership and psychology that was focused on the text Change: Principles of Problem Formation and Problem Resolution.  The discussions often overlapped with the concept of thinking outside the box in order for change to be possible.

Example from parenting

(not from experience, no kids yet):

Son keeps locking himself in room to try and avoid interacting with family.  Parents want their son to interact more and stop being so evasive.

Remove the locks.

The answer is simple, but it breaks a rule that wasn’t even a rule.  There’s a lock on the door.  It was already there, so it must be a requirement.

I feel like this is how educators and learners get stuck.  That’s how it was, so that’s how it should be, and that’s how it will continue to be.  The educator I started out being is only some arbitrary portion of the one I am today.  How did that happen?  I’m pretty sure I didn’t just do what everybody else was doing.  I also did do the same thing that I did the day before.  Often times I had an inclination that a lesson could have gone a different way, an activity or assessment could have been more authentic, or there may be an alternative to what I had tried in the class.

2014-04-30_1319

What are we so afraid of?

Why don’t we try new things or different things in the class?  Maybe it’s a matter of effort and exhaustion.  Maybe it’s discomfort with what others may see as failure.  Maybe we would rather be safe than sorry because the development of the youth in the class is at stake.  I don’t know what it is, but I’m more afraid of thinking that this is how things should be for the rest of my life and I might as well get comfortable with it.

Too Much Change?

Is it possible that change actually turns into chaos?  I would say yes.  In fact, this year has probably felt more like chaos than progress.  That is, until I start to reflect on what has been accomplished through interactions with others.  Blogging, tweeting, GHOs, and meet-ups have been huge stabilizers for me.  Sharing experiences with others and learning from others experiences supports taking these leaps of change.

Where do I start?

Write it down.  Talk about it.  Be social about it.  Journal.  Locking yourself up in a room for 7+ hours a day won’t get you to change.  Break the locks and start looking for others that are trying to break out as well.  Start small or jump in, but however it may be:

Toilet Seat Do Something

Sounds Familiar #MTBoS30 10 of 30

My brother was in a band called “Sounds Familiar” back in high school.  They played up the idea that no one should forget their name.

My dad posed the question, “Isn’t it possible that we can run out of songs.  Don’t they eventually sound familiar?”

VSauce breaks down the countable differences in music with a video:

(in which he mentions a website to compare familiar sounds)

And TED.com recently highlighted a talk discussing the culture shifts in sharing and sampling sound from one another.

 

These reminded me of a question on counting and probability.  If you haven’t already, let yourself get distracted with Incredibox.  You won’t be disappointed.  How many unique songs can one make with it?  I think this would be a great project for a math class discussing counting principles.  Let the students determine parameters for uniqueness.  Maybe there can be more than one level of uniqueness (same beat+different melody <different beat+different melody).  I’m laying this down, #MTBoS.  Who’s up for the challenge to break it down?

%d bloggers like this: