Sum it Up, Angle Edition: Part 1

360 Wheel

Somewhere, I don’t know where for sure, a student learned that one common way to measure a full rotation is 360o.  I would even say this generation is more aware of this concept with the popularity of sports that involve rotation(s).  I could mention the number 1080 in a class and many students would have at least a minimal intuition that it had something to do with revolutions/rotations.  Imagine you are that student and start from there:

The Basics (prior knowledge)

  1. Full Turn =  360o.
  2. Half Turn = 180o (call it straight angle)
  3. Quarter Turn = 90o (call it a right angle)

Number Sense (and decomposition)

“How many ways do you think you can fill in these boxes?”

90 = [?] + [?]
90 = [?] + 41
90 = 29 + [?]
180 = [?] + [?]
180 = [89] + [?]
180 = [?] + 27
180 = [?] + [?] + [?]
180 = 90 + 80 + [?]
180 = 70 + [?] + [?]
 Supplementary Supplementary 3 piece Complementary

Playtime

After 1-3 minutes of getting out their Chromebooks, loading the applet and playing, I give the students a specific angle measure to move to, like angle BAE = 40o.  Next a simple task: find all the measures.

“Mr Butler, I don’t know what to do?”  “Mr. Butler, but there’s not enough information.”  and more of this kind of thing for about 30 seconds.

Then one student elbows the other, “ow, why’d you do that?!”

“Check this out, I can find this one.”

“Oh oh, I can find the next one look here it’s a quarter turn, we just need the other piece and go backwards like we did a few minutes ago”

10 minutes later we share.  And there are soooooo many different methods used, a good amount of them correct.  In the end it was easy to check though.  The total angles made a full revolution, the one measure everyone knew coming in.  For those that were incorrect we talk about how the error took place, (was it arithmetic? or reasoning?)

We repeat this process with two or three more different starting measures for the angle controlled by the slider (let the students choose the angle for at least one of those).

Vocabulary

Oddly enough, vocabulary seems to stick better once the students have a context to put it in.  These quarter turns, that make a CCCCorner are call CCCComplementary, these half turns, that make a SSSSStraight line (or Straight angle) are called SSSSSupplementary.  Somewhere in this process students start to notice the relationship in angles across from each other at an intersection are equal.  We draw the criss-cross X and get the term Vertical.  At this point we are only about 3/4 through 1 class period.

Finale

Move the angle to _____ and  prove to me (with addition or subtraction) which angles are:

  • Complementary
  • Supplementary
  • Vertical

(There’s two for each)

Mr. Butler adds, “Hey class, oh and by the way, we just reviewed Algebra and solving equations.”

“You’re sneaky Mr. Butler”

Then the bell rings…

… to be continued…

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About Mr-Butler

Math Geek Volleyballer Crochet Crazy

Posted on March 14, 2014, in Algebra, Geogebra, Geometry, Good Teaching, Technology, Transformation, Transformulas.org and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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